Author Topic: Guide to Aftermarket Air Filters/Induction Kits  (Read 14318 times)

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Offline dicky

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Guide to Aftermarket Air Filters/Induction Kits
« on: July 01, 2006, 18:12:51 PM »
Stock-V-Aftermarket Filters
For some time now people have believed that aftermarket air filters are a must have and believe that they will see noticeable gains in engine power output by fitting one of these to their Vauxhall Nova 1.2 Merit. This is far from the truth however as there are many other variables that relate to how an engine can produce more power while retaining the efficiency of filtration of the incoming air. There are two main aftermarket air filter materials including Oiled-Gauze and Foam which can be incorporated into either replacement Panel Filters or Cone Filters (Induction Kits).

Panel Filters:
The Foam filter was initially used in off-road motor sport where muddy and moist environments can cause stock paper filter elements to break down causing a low efficiency of filtration. These Foam Filters were designed to withstand breakdown and to filter the air of dust and other particulates but to also maintain high flow rates of air into the engines. Long term reliability are not issues that race teams need to worry about as engines are striped down and rebuilt on a regular basis and so the filters need not be in with manufactures specifications for filtration efficiency. 1st image shows foam panel filter 2nd image shows stock paper panel filter.



The Oiled-Gauze filter uses a metal gauze/paper mesh coated in special oil formulated to filter out dust and other contaminates with out sacrificing flow rates of air into the engine. These filters usually fall within specification of manufactures requirements but only just. Although this is dependent on whether the filter is regularly oiled and cleaned to maintain its filtration efficiency. These filters are re-usable and can be cleaned and re-oiled as often as required. They do flow better than stock paper filters but tend not to have a very good dirt loading capacity and so require regular cleaning. Typically manufactures recommend an air filter to be 95% efficient in terms of filtration and to comply with ISO-5011. The K&N air filters fall with in this boundary at 96.8%. A typical stock filter is around 98-99% efficient and can hold almost twice as much dirt. In summery these aftermarket panel filters offer little in terms of increased performance and require more maintenance. This also disproves the idea that such aftermarket filters let in allot of dust particles that can cause excessive cylinder bore and ring wear.

ISO 5011-Inlet air cleaning equipment for internal combustion engines and compressors. Performance testing:
The ISO 5011 Standard (formerly SAE J726) defines a precise filter test using precision measurements under controlled conditions. Temperature & humidity of the test dust and air used in the test are strictly monitored and controlled. A small temperature change or a small change in humidity can cause the mass of a paper filter to change by several grams. The test data usually consists of two test reports; Capacity-Efficiency and Flow Restriction.

Capacity and Efficiency:
The Capacity and Efficiency test report presents the test results of feeding an initially clean filter with PTI Course Test Dust (dirt) at a constant rate and airflow. The course test dust has a specific distribution of particle sizes ranging from less than 2.5 microns to greater than 80 microns. Every filter is initially tested at 350 CFM and the Initial Restriction or differential pressure across the filter is recorded in IN-H20 (Inches of Water). The filter is then tested by feeding test dust at a nominal rate of 9.8 grams per minute with a constant airflow of 350 CFM. The test is continued until the flow restriction exceeds the Initial Restriction + 10 IN-H20. At this point the test is terminated and the amount dust passed through the filter - Accumulative Gain - is measured. Dirt passing through the filter is captured in the Test Station

Offline [email protected]

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Re: Guide to Aftermarket Air Filters/Induction Kits
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2006, 00:12:09 AM »
Any kind of air filter inevitably restricts air flow into the engine.  That's why on some out and out performance machines you see bell-mouth air intakes going direct into the carbs.  However, no air filter means that any particles floating around the air get into your engine, where they can act as an abrasive.
As Dicky says, you can get filters that restrict air flow less than paper filters, but this inevitably means that they also allow slightly larger dust particles to get in.  If the engine is being stripped down regularly, as in racing cars, this doesn't matter, but in a road car this eventually leads to a build up of dirt in the engine, some of which gets into the oil and circulates around the engine and some gets burned onto surfaces in the engine.
I once fitted a twin-choke Weber carb to an engine.  The original huge air filter box didn't fit the Weber, so I had to replace it with a 'pancake' air filter sitting on top of the carb.  This worked fine until one cold winter night when the engine started faltering on the M1.  On pulling in to Woolley Edge, near Leeds, I discovered that ice was forming around the body of the carburetor.  The original filter box had a warm air intake, but the 'pancake' filter was only getting cold air and the moisture was freezing in the venturi!

az 1

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Re: Guide to Aftermarket Air Filters/Induction Kits
« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2007, 22:57:27 PM »
which air filter would you recomend k n or green cotton air filter? is there any difference?

jaz6252calibra

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Re: Guide to Aftermarket Air Filters/Induction Kits
« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2007, 20:02:07 PM »
I fitted a K&N to the car, didnt come with a cold air feed. Obviously needs one or there is no point. The car's just suckin in hot air.
Any ideas as to where to get one.

Offline [email protected]

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Re: Guide to Aftermarket Air Filters/Induction Kits
« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2007, 23:33:14 PM »
I fitted a K&N to the car, didnt come with a cold air feed. Obviously needs one or there is no point. The car's just suckin in hot air.
Any ideas as to where to get one.

AFAIK no one supplies them - you have to fabricate it yourself.  I feel sure that there must be a guide somewhere from someone who has already done it.  The usual way is to remove the front towing-eye cover and replace it by an air-intake, then use some tube to create a duct from the intake to the air filter.

K30

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Re: Guide to Aftermarket Air Filters/Induction Kits
« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2007, 07:57:40 AM »
ive got the cold air filter coming in through one of the holes in the front bumper.  the smaller one in the middle.


thebootyfiller

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Re: Guide to Aftermarket Air Filters/Induction Kits
« Reply #7 on: June 03, 2007, 18:05:25 PM »
i bought my cold air feed from halfords its a pipercross..........

cost

Offline Ben

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Re: Guide to Aftermarket Air Filters/Induction Kits
« Reply #8 on: June 03, 2007, 20:27:22 PM »
what diameter pipe will we need to attach to the original air filter box  ???
If she thinks you don't love her then
a) Take her out for a meal
b) Buy her some flowers or
c) Cram it in her ass. Dry.
Then she'll know you do!

Offline Mr V

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Re: Guide to Aftermarket Air Filters/Induction Kits
« Reply #9 on: June 03, 2007, 20:34:35 PM »
what diameter pipe will we need to attach to the original air filter box  ???

Any size from 76cm (3") upwards :)

My pipe is 100cm.

matty0785

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Re: Guide to Aftermarket Air Filters/Induction Kits
« Reply #10 on: June 03, 2007, 20:52:56 PM »
had a K and N cone filter on my 8 valve for the last few months and decided to refit the airbox due to all the rain lately boy what a diference the car goes so much better with the standard airbox and new standard filter lol 

K and N now in that pile of junk in the garage neva to be fitted again

Offline Ben

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Re: Guide to Aftermarket Air Filters/Induction Kits
« Reply #11 on: June 03, 2007, 21:11:37 PM »
Any size from 76cm (3") upwards :)

My pipe is 100cm.

100cm god thats big LOL
we all know you mean 100mm haha i will try and get a 80mm one then
If she thinks you don't love her then
a) Take her out for a meal
b) Buy her some flowers or
c) Cram it in her ass. Dry.
Then she'll know you do!

Offline Mr V

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Re: Guide to Aftermarket Air Filters/Induction Kits
« Reply #12 on: June 03, 2007, 21:30:42 PM »
Ooops that should be 76mm (3") .................  ::)

and mine is 100mm  :D

mp

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Re: Guide to Aftermarket Air Filters/Induction Kits
« Reply #13 on: June 13, 2007, 14:12:41 PM »
I want to fit an induction kit to my 96 ecotec cally and was wondering if anyone out there has done this and can tell me 1: is it worth doing? and 2: what kit would work best?

cheers

Nemesis222

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Re: Guide to Aftermarket Air Filters/Induction Kits
« Reply #14 on: January 14, 2008, 12:11:50 PM »
i fitted a k&n cone air filter but it makes a bloody horrible noise. i have used these filters on most cars i have owned and the sound is really sporty, especially when the car is pulling in lower revs, but on my calibra ecotec it sounds like a hole in an exhaust ! any ideas why this is ? if there is no solution to this problem i might just drill holes in the lower half of the original airbox as this apparently works and sounds pretty good aswell !